Immediate hazards after Pyloric Stenosis

Parents - worry01Having your new baby go through surgery, however “minor” in the eyes of the medical world, is always harrowing for the parents.  Those who have written about this will almost always say it was their most traumatic time ever, and some continue to suffer post-traumatic stress.

Remember that this surgery almost always follows a period of your infant being sick and steadily losing condition, followed by what may be a deeply upsetting period of doctor visits, medical tests, specialist consultations, and typical hospital admission procedures – with baby’s condition steadily going downhill…

Remember also that doctors are human: far too many treat their fragile patients and parents poorly, and diagnosis is too often avoided or faulty, too often ending only at a near-terminal crisis.  All this adds to the stress and strain.

Add to this that surgery for infant pyloric stenosis (“PS”) surgery is often promised to be a “quick fix”.  Although many of these little patients do recover promptly and quickly more than catch up on their weight loss, other PS babies take months or even years to find their balance – and some few never do.

Add to this that many surgeons seem to regard their responsibilities as ending when they leave the operating room, and that many GPs simply don’t engage with parents who have a baby with a feeding problem.

What are the main problems parents may have to manage after PS surgery? Continue reading “Immediate hazards after Pyloric Stenosis”

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Adult Pyloric Stenosis

Infant pyloric stenosis (“PS”) is not well-known in the general community.  Even fewer (in fact, far less) people know anything about the adult form of PS.

The stories of adult PSers vary even more than those about the infant form of the condition.  However, the basic cause is the same: high gastric acidity. And the symptoms are in general the same: Continue reading “Adult Pyloric Stenosis”

Infant pyloric stenosis – and its possible long-term effects

For almost two years I have been posting weekly about infant pyloric stenosis (“PS”) and I am grateful to the readers who have given me the valued feedback that they appreciate my solid research and lucid and careful writing.

WordPress (which hosts my blogsite) also gives me feedback, and it’s not surprising that the top number of searches here have been for information about the long-term effects of PS and the surgery for it.  Using the Search box (top right on this page) will allow you to read all my blogs on this subject – but to overview and add to this material, please read on…

The long-term effects of severe PS

Studies have shown that the severe malnutrition of a baby which is far too common before PS is diagnosed and treated can affect its memory and the development of its motor skills and coordination.  A link with Continue reading “Infant pyloric stenosis – and its possible long-term effects”

An abdominal scar and pregnancy

I have a surgical scar on my stomach: how will this affect me during my pregnancy?

This reasonable and very understandable concern affects many people – and there are many women who very much want a child despite uncertainty caused by having had an abdominal operation.

Why should I, a male and not a professional medical worker, be writing about this?

Being male I am very hesitant to address this question – so here’s why I’m posting this… Continue reading “An abdominal scar and pregnancy”

Long-term hazards

When your baby had infant pyloric stenosis (“PS”), the surgery marked the end of a difficult time for you and your newborn treasure… Right?

If that’s true of you as parents or you as the baby, you belong to the truly blessed ones – at least in this respect!

Patient & doctor01Most doctors and websites tell the parents that there are no long-term problems after PS and its surgery (pyloromyotomy).  Only a minority of the websites I have seen are a little more careful, assuring us that “most” babies will have no more problems.  None go into detail about that “most”.

In 20 years of trawling the web I have yet to find Continue reading “Long-term hazards”

Scars that strangle

Readers of this post may well know what adhesions are, but just to be sure, let’s start at the very beginning…

What are adhesions?

Adhesions are bands and webs of tough, fibrous and inelastic scar tissue which develop after tissue damage resulting from injury, surgery, an internal infection, endometriosis, some chemotherapy, or radiation therapy.  They can affect the functioning of muscles, joints, and ligaments, but cause most problems in the abdomen and chest where they can grow between our organs and the abdominal wall, or restrict the movement and work of our organs, causing pain and possibly restricting their function.

Adhesiolysis01.jpgAbout 10% of all people develop adhesions naturally (without surgical or other damage), but it is estimated that they occur in over 90% of people who have abdominal or chest surgery – which means many of us! So we may be thankful that they cause significant problems for only a minority – but that’s small comfort if you belong to that minority.

These problems range from unsightly sunken scars and pain to life-threatening abdominal blockages.  Adhesions cause 60 – 70% of small (upper) bowel obstructions in adults and can be the cause of chronic pelvic pain.

Some of us who have had infant surgery for infant pyloric stenosis, or for that matter any of a list of the diseases of the abdomen and chest may find that Continue reading “Scars that strangle”