An abdominal scar and pregnancy

I have a surgical scar on my stomach: how will this affect me during my pregnancy?

This reasonable and very understandable concern affects many people – and there are many women who very much want a child despite uncertainty caused by having had an abdominal operation.

Why should I, a male and not a professional medical worker, be writing about this?

Being male I am very hesitant to address this question – so here’s why I’m posting this… Continue reading “An abdominal scar and pregnancy”

Long-term hazards

When your baby had infant pyloric stenosis (“PS”), the surgery marked the end of a difficult time for you and your newborn treasure… Right?

If that’s true of you as parents or you as the baby, you belong to the truly blessed ones – at least in this respect!

Patient & doctor01Most doctors and websites tell the parents that there are no long-term problems after PS and its surgery (pyloromyotomy).  Only a minority of the websites I have seen are a little more careful, assuring us that “most” babies will have no more problems.  None go into detail about that “most”.

In 20 years of trawling the web I have yet to find Continue reading “Long-term hazards”

Scars that strangle

Readers of this post may well know what adhesions are, but just to be sure, let’s start at the very beginning…

What are adhesions?

Adhesions are bands and webs of tough, fibrous and inelastic scar tissue which develop after tissue damage resulting from injury, surgery, an internal infection, endometriosis, some chemotherapy, or radiation therapy.  They can affect the functioning of muscles, joints, and ligaments, but cause most problems in the abdomen and chest where they can grow between our organs and the abdominal wall, or restrict the movement and work of our organs, causing pain and possibly restricting their function.

Adhesiolysis01.jpgAbout 10% of all people develop adhesions naturally (without surgical or other damage), but it is estimated that they occur in over 90% of people who have abdominal or chest surgery – which means many of us! So we may be thankful that they cause significant problems for only a minority – but that’s small comfort if you belong to that minority.

These problems range from unsightly sunken scars and pain to life-threatening abdominal blockages.  Adhesions cause 60 – 70% of small (upper) bowel obstructions in adults and can be the cause of chronic pelvic pain.

Some of us who have had infant surgery for infant pyloric stenosis, or for that matter any of a list of the diseases of the abdomen and chest may find that Continue reading “Scars that strangle”

Infant pyloric stenosis – and its possible long-term effects

Patient & doctor03People who have had a close experience of infant Pyloric Stenosis (whether their own or as a parent) are often bewildered and perhaps bemused by the medical mantra that “You’ll have a new child – there are no known long-term effects”.

We can be thankful that it seems that this well-meant but misleading assurance is usually (but far from always) valid, both in the short and long term.  Because Pyloric Stenosis (“PS”) is rather common (2-5 in every 1,000 babies is a huge number world-wide) the widespread lack of awareness of and interest in the possible long-term effects of PS is probably a good indication that ongoing problems affect only a relatively small number – but again, worldwide this is a huge number. The web forum pages of Facebook, MedHelp, Patient, and Topix bear this out.  So do the more than 100+ visits each day to my original Blog (started in 2010).

If only our experiences and the facts agreed with that mantra!  This Blog is all about doing something about “What we wish we’d known” (its web address).

Short term long term cartoon02WordPress (which hosts my older blog) also gives me feedback, and it’s not surprising that the top number of searches there have been for information about the long-term effects of PS and the surgery for it.  In this post I overview the material I posted about this to my original Blog. In the coming months I plan to post progressively to this Blog, which has an Index Page (see the banner at the top of this screen) to enable readers to overview and access its contents.

What we wish we’d known and what we want to know about the possible long-term effects of PS… please read on… Continue reading “Infant pyloric stenosis – and its possible long-term effects”

Is there a link between infant Pyloric Stenosis and later abdominal trouble?

Most General Practitioners (GPs) will reject any link out of hand.  Some GPs have even been known to ask their patient (or client) what “PS” (pyloric stenosis) is.

patient and doctor talkingWe can be sure that every medical textbook and training includes at least a page or part of a lecture on PS, which is the most common reason for non-elective surgery on infants in their first months and years.  But who can blame a medical student for not remembering everything they are told and read over six or more packed years? Let alone what is currently known about a condition most GPs will encounter only rarely? Continue reading “Is there a link between infant Pyloric Stenosis and later abdominal trouble?”