Immediate hazards after Pyloric Stenosis

Parents - worry01Having your new baby go through surgery, however “minor” in the eyes of the medical world, is always harrowing for the parents.  Those who have written about this will almost always say it was their most traumatic time ever, and some continue to suffer post-traumatic stress.

Remember that this surgery almost always follows a period of your infant being sick and steadily losing condition, followed by what may be a deeply upsetting period of doctor visits, medical tests, specialist consultations, and typical hospital admission procedures – with baby’s condition steadily going downhill…

Remember also that doctors are human: far too many treat their fragile patients and parents poorly, and diagnosis is too often avoided or faulty, too often ending only at a near-terminal crisis.  All this adds to the stress and strain.

Add to this that surgery for infant pyloric stenosis (“PS”) surgery is often promised to be a “quick fix”.  Although many of these little patients do recover promptly and quickly more than catch up on their weight loss, other PS babies take months or even years to find their balance – and some few never do.

Add to this that many surgeons seem to regard their responsibilities as ending when they leave the operating room, and that many GPs simply don’t engage with parents who have a baby with a feeding problem.

What are the main problems parents may have to manage after PS surgery? Continue reading “Immediate hazards after Pyloric Stenosis”

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Why your doctor may delay diagnosing Pyloric Stenosis

A member / friend in Facebook’s Pyloric Stenosis (“PS”) network messaged me:

After having a baby with PS I find it very difficult to understand why it takes so long for the doctors or specialist to diagnose it.  Just like to know your thoughts.  We were obviously extremely lucky.

Several other common problems around infant PS were raised and we’ll seek to address each of these in the following posts.

If like this parent your baby’s (or your) PS was recognised and treated promptly without ongoing problems, you are indeed lucky and will feel very grateful to all concerned.

Mum w crying baby01But if you or your parents suffered to the extent of being traumatised by PS, you join a sizeable club!  Social forum sites such as Facebook, BabyCenter (or –Centre), MedHelp, and Topix have allowed many thousands of parents and PSers to voice their unhappy experience of medical matters related to PS.

Well may we all wonder about the actual number of people with the problems on this parent’s mind.  For readers who are wondering, What are the problems? please read on… Continue reading “Why your doctor may delay diagnosing Pyloric Stenosis”

Launching Our PS Awareness Blog

Pyloric Stenosis (PS) treatment has come a long way since my surgery for this condition in 1952. In the old days, babies were isolated after the operation, no family visiting. No nice clear plastic surgical tubing brought oxygen and fluids to the baby; the “hoses were black, an inch thick, and so numerous, I could hardly see you,” my mother told me. And my scar was formidable, like a crazy TV antenna, which grew bigger with time.

Today, rocking chairs in neonatal intensive care units, or NICUs, are often made available for family visits. The surgical tubing is light-weight and clear, adhesive strips with cartoon images  holding them in place. And the scar?  Smaller, given the possibility of having a laparoscopic pyloromyotomy versus an open procedure for which the incision, hence the scar, would be bigger. Even so, the scar from the open method or Ramstedt’s surgery of today is far more cosmetic than an earlier one. Finally, baby is typically released after one or two days as opposed to ten days to two weeks! Continue reading “Launching Our PS Awareness Blog”

Building greater awareness

This Blog is for people troubled because of infant pyloric stenosis – their baby’s or their own.

Patient & doctor03.jpgFor many people, pyloric stenosis (“PS”) is something they’ve never heard of, even though all of us probably know several people who have had it.

Most people who have experienced PS (either as a parent or close family member, or personally) have been able to put what they often say was their “most traumatic experience ever” behind them.  I suspect and hope that these folk are a “silent majority”.

However, there are many (I believe quite a sizeable minority) who are or have been deeply troubled by PS, either as the parents of a PS baby, or as a “survivor”. Continue reading “Building greater awareness”

Is there a link between infant Pyloric Stenosis and later abdominal trouble?

Most General Practitioners (GPs) will reject any link out of hand.  Some GPs have even been known to ask their patient (or client) what “PS” (pyloric stenosis) is.

patient and doctor talkingWe can be sure that every medical textbook and training includes at least a page or part of a lecture on PS, which is the most common reason for non-elective surgery on infants in their first months and years.  But who can blame a medical student for not remembering everything they are told and read over six or more packed years? Let alone what is currently known about a condition most GPs will encounter only rarely? Continue reading “Is there a link between infant Pyloric Stenosis and later abdominal trouble?”

After infant surgery – untangling the emotional baggage

Shmool Roey 1612Last December my wife and I welcomed a friend and film-maker from the US.  I worked with him on a documentary he is making on a subject of common interest to all of us – the effects of infant surgery done when it was widely believed (esp. pre-1990) in the medical world that babies don’t feel or remember pain.  Yikes!  Yes, really.

My friend has interviewed several of us who had infant surgery in the “dark ages” and he is now recording interviews with several professionals who have written about or provide therapy for people affected by pre-conscious but unremembered (“somatic memory”) trauma.
We hope the result will be available Continue reading “After infant surgery – untangling the emotional baggage”