Immediate hazards after Pyloric Stenosis

Parents - worry01Having your new baby go through surgery, however “minor” in the eyes of the medical world, is always harrowing for the parents.  Those who have written about this will almost always say it was their most traumatic time ever, and some continue to suffer post-traumatic stress.

Remember that this surgery almost always follows a period of your infant being sick and steadily losing condition, followed by what may be a deeply upsetting period of doctor visits, medical tests, specialist consultations, and typical hospital admission procedures – with baby’s condition steadily going downhill…

Remember also that doctors are human: far too many treat their fragile patients and parents poorly, and diagnosis is too often avoided or faulty, too often ending only at a near-terminal crisis.  All this adds to the stress and strain.

Add to this that surgery for infant pyloric stenosis (“PS”) surgery is often promised to be a “quick fix”.  Although many of these little patients do recover promptly and quickly more than catch up on their weight loss, other PS babies take months or even years to find their balance – and some few never do.

Add to this that many surgeons seem to regard their responsibilities as ending when they leave the operating room, and that many GPs simply don’t engage with parents who have a baby with a feeding problem.

What are the main problems parents may have to manage after PS surgery? Continue reading “Immediate hazards after Pyloric Stenosis”

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Building greater awareness

This Blog is for people troubled because of infant pyloric stenosis – their baby’s or their own.

Patient & doctor03.jpgFor many people, pyloric stenosis (“PS”) is something they’ve never heard of, even though all of us probably know several people who have had it.

Most people who have experienced PS (either as a parent or close family member, or personally) have been able to put what they often say was their “most traumatic experience ever” behind them.  I suspect and hope that these folk are a “silent majority”.

However, there are many (I believe quite a sizeable minority) who are or have been deeply troubled by PS, either as the parents of a PS baby, or as a “survivor”. Continue reading “Building greater awareness”

Is there a link between infant Pyloric Stenosis and later abdominal trouble?

Most General Practitioners (GPs) will reject any link out of hand.  Some GPs have even been known to ask their patient (or client) what “PS” (pyloric stenosis) is.

patient and doctor talkingWe can be sure that every medical textbook and training includes at least a page or part of a lecture on PS, which is the most common reason for non-elective surgery on infants in their first months and years.  But who can blame a medical student for not remembering everything they are told and read over six or more packed years? Let alone what is currently known about a condition most GPs will encounter only rarely? Continue reading “Is there a link between infant Pyloric Stenosis and later abdominal trouble?”