Launching Our PS Awareness Blog

Pyloric Stenosis (PS) treatment has come a long way since my surgery for this condition in 1952. In the old days, babies were isolated after the operation, no family visiting. No nice clear plastic surgical tubing brought oxygen and fluids to the baby; the “hoses were black, an inch thick, and so numerous, I could hardly see you,” my mother told me. And my scar was formidable, like a crazy TV antenna, which grew bigger with time.

Today, rocking chairs in neonatal intensive care units, or NICUs, are often made available for family visits. The surgical tubing is light-weight and clear, adhesive strips with cartoon images  holding them in place. And the scar?  Smaller, given the possibility of having a laparoscopic pyloromyotomy versus an open procedure for which the incision, hence the scar, would be bigger. Even so, the scar from the open method or Ramstedt’s surgery of today is far more cosmetic than an earlier one. Finally, baby is typically released after one or two days as opposed to ten days to two weeks! Continue reading “Launching Our PS Awareness Blog”

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To Be or Not Be …….. Grateful

Written by Wendy Patrice Williams on November 2, 2016

As adult survivors of infant surgery without anesthesia, it’s difficult to be angry about what happened to us early on. We feel grateful for having been helped and saved, and we should. The surgeons, the nurses, the staff, our parents, and families leaned in and lent a hand. We survived because of them. What’s not to be grateful for? Continue reading “To Be or Not Be …….. Grateful”

After infant surgery – untangling the emotional baggage

Shmool Roey 1612Last December my wife and I welcomed a friend and film-maker from the US.  I worked with him on a documentary he is making on a subject of common interest to all of us – the effects of infant surgery done when it was widely believed (esp. pre-1990) in the medical world that babies don’t feel or remember pain.  Yikes!  Yes, really.

My friend has interviewed several of us who had infant surgery in the “dark ages” and he is now recording interviews with several professionals who have written about or provide therapy for people affected by pre-conscious but unremembered (“somatic memory”) trauma.
We hope the result will be available Continue reading “After infant surgery – untangling the emotional baggage”